Golfo di Napoli  Tuff  Location: 40°47' N, 17°10' E  The Ischia volcanic complex forms a rectangular,  6 x 9 km island immediately SW of the Campi  Flegrei area at the western side of the Bay of  Naples. The eruption of the trachytic Green Tuff  ignimbrite about 56,000 years ago was followed  by caldera formation. The high point on the  island, 789-m-high Monte Epomeo, is a volcanic  horst composed of the Green Tuff ignimbrite  deposit that was submerged after its eruption and  then uplifted. Volcanism on the island has been  significantly affected by tectonism that formed a  series of horsts and grabens; at least 800 m of  uplift has formed as a result of resurgent doming  during past 33,000. Volcanism during the  Holocene produced a series of pumiceous tephras, tuff rings, lava domes, and lava flows, and a  major collapse of Mount Epomeo produced a large submarine debris-avalanche deposit. The latest  eruption of Ischia, in 1302 AD, produced a spatter cone and the Arso lava flow, which reached the  NE coast. (Global Volcanism Program)  click on pictures to enlarge Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo. Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar HOME April / May 2007 Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar Photo: Rolf Cosar GoogleEarth